News

Graves Lecture Video Now Available

Graves_0010webx

Dr. Joseph L. Graves Jr. visited Wake Forest University to present “Evolutionary Versus Racial Medicine: Why It Matters” on February 6, 2014.

Dr. Graves is the Associate Dean for Research at the Joint School of Nanoscience & Nanoengineering, North Carolina A&T University and UNC Greensboro.  He is also a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Section G: Biological Sciences and was named to the National Science Foundation’s Sensational Sixty in 2013.  He has published over sixty papers and book chapters and appeared in six documentary films and numerous television interviews.

In his presentation, Dr. Graves discussed the biological and social definitions of race.  He explained how these concepts differ and why conflating the two has had disastrous consequences for biomedical research and clinical practice.  Graves will also discuss why understanding basic evolutionary mechanisms are indispensable for comprehending human biological variation and how these in turn may be applied to addressing ongoing health disparities.

A video of this lecture is now available here.

This event was sponsored by the Wake Forest Museum of Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, Department of Biology, Department of Sociology, American Ethnic Studies Program, Office of Multicultural Affairs, Center for Bioethics, Health, and Society, Institute for Public Engagement, and Humanities Institute.

MOA Receives NEH Grant

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) recently selected the Museum of Anthropology as a grantees.  The Museum was one of only three institutions in North Carolina chosen to receive funding for 2013.  The NEH awarded the MOA a grant of $5,022 for wall mounted art storage screens.  Registrar and Collections Manager Kyle Bryner developed the project in order to complete the final stages of rehousing the permanent collection in the Museum’s offsite storage facility.  The screens will provide a storage solution for the collection’s oversize weaponry, including arrows, bows, spears, harpoons, and staffs, as well as other tools and weapons too large to fit on compact storage shelves.  The screens will also allow for proper storage of large framed objects such as two Comanche painted hides and a framed collection of North Carolina projectile points.  The grant is part of $14.6 million awarded by the NEH to 202 projects in 43 states and the District of Columbia.

 

Conservation Fundraising Focuses on Yoruba Object

House of the HeadBGnewsIn November, the Museum launched its annual campaign to support the “Save Our Hide” Conservation Fund.  This account allows tax-deductible donations to be set aside to restore important artifacts to their former glory so they can be placed on exhibit, furthering the Museum’s mission to provide opportunities for intercultural learning.  This year, the Museum staff selected a Yoruba object from Nigeria known as a house of the head, or ile ori, as the focus of the fundraising drive.  The Yoruba believe that the head is the seat of a life force that determines a person’s essential nature and destiny.  The house of the head shrine is designed to contain a person’s inner spiritual essence.  It is the center of rituals and offerings to ensure good fortune and an ideal fate.  The Museum’s house of the head is made of cloth embellished with colored glass beads.  Due to its condition, it must be stabilized before it can be exhibited for the first time.  The help of our patrons is essential to completing the conservation of this artifact.  Please contact Sara Cromwell at moa@nullwfu.edu or 336.758.5282 if you are interested in providing financial assistance for this important project.

 

MOA to Showcase Lakota Quilts and Crafts

The Museum of Anthropology  will feature Creating: Quilts and Crafts of the Lakota from November 5, 2013 to January 25, 2014.  The exhibition combines two independent but related exhibits. Creating: Quilts of the Lakota is organized by The Heritage Center at Red Cloud Indian School, Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, and the Arthur Ross Gallery at the University of Pennsylvania.  Contemporary Creations: Arts and Crafts by Lakota Artists is organized by C-H Jacobson Produktion AB of Stockholm, Sweden.   The combined exhibit presents 20 eye-dazzling quilts and 32 items of apparel and dance regalia made in traditional style by Lakota artisans.

The MOA will share the combined exhibit with Delta Arts Center, also in Winston-Salem.  Each venue will display about half of the quilts and crafts. For the complete experience, visitors are encouraged to visit both museums.

Quilting has long been a part of the cultural heritage of the Lakota Sioux in South Dakota. However, some of the most exquisite works produced by tribe members have never been seen outside of the reservation. The exhibit highlights outstanding examples of 20th century and contemporary works.  Although similar in construction to other American quilts, the iconography of these Lakota textiles reflect a Sioux Oclala religious and cultural heritage that is largely unknown in this part of the country. The insertion of symbols from popular culture (e.g. the basketball or flag) as well makes these works different from other folk textiles.

Continue reading »

MOA Joins Smithsonian’s Museum Day Live!

The Museum of Anthropology is pleased to announce its participation in Smithsonian magazine’s ninth annual Museum Day Live! on Saturday, September 28.  A nationwide event, Museum Day Live! offers free admission to visitors presenting a Museum Day Live! ticket at a participating museum or cultural institution.

Inclusive by design, the event represents Smithsonian’s commitment to making learning and the spread of knowledge accessible to everyone.  Museums across all 50 states will have the opportunity to emulate the admission policy of the Smithsonian museums in Washington, D.C.  Last year, more than 400,000 people attended Museum Day Live! across the United States.

“Although the Museum of Anthropology will continue to offer free admission to all visitors, we are excited to be able to share in the Smithsonian Institution’s celebration of arts, culture, and knowledge,” said PR, Marketing & Membership Coordinator Sara Cromwell.

Visitors to the Museum of Anthropology can explore global cultures through artifacts from the Americas, Africa, Asia, and Oceania.  The two featured exhibits are Celebrating 50 Years of the Museum of Anthropology, and Life After Death: The Day of the Dead in Mexico.

Visitors can download the Museum Day Live! ticket and find a complete list of participating museums at cultural institutions at smithsonian.com/museumday. Visitors who present the ticket will gain free admission for two at participating venues.

MOA Continues to Celebrate Golden Anniversary

The Museum will continue to celebrate its 50th anniversary through this fall.  The actual anniversary date of the Museum’s opening is Monday, September 23, which was the first day of classes in 1963.  All visitors to the MOA during the week of September 23 will receive a small gift as a token of appreciation for 50 years of support.

On Saturday, October 19, from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m., the Museum will host its Golden Anniversary Gala.  Patrons will enjoy a culinary tour of the world featuring heavy hors d’oeuvres relating to each of the Museum’s exhibits, wine and beer.  Appropriate attire is casual yet classy.  As the Gala is being held in conjunction with Wake Forest’s Homecoming weekend, we welcome alumni to come straight from the game.  Tickets are $30 each ($20 for MOA Friends).  To purchase tickets, please contact Sara Cromwell, PR, Marketing & Membership Coordinator, at 336-758-5282 or moa@nullwfu.edu.   Homecoming attendees can RSVP and pay for tickets with their Homecoming registration.